Case Study of a Failed M&A—Concluding Thoughts on Microsoft’s Acquisition of Nokia

The research conducted in this paper is based upon the Mergers & Acquisitions Synergies Framework, developed by combining outside findings by Geert Hofstede, Erin Meyer, and Sidney Gray.[1] It is limited to national culture factors, which play a different role in business than organizational culture. Further studies may need to be conducted to help distinguish differences between national and organizational cultures.

In reality, Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia was doomed to fail. The deal was an exercise in futility, governed by the rationale that any attempt to compete with Apple and Google is better than none at all. Such rationale exhibits an astonishing lack of prudence, which is key in making any deal, let alone a cross-border deal. While Microsoft’s rationale for making the deal was poor, management’s lack of patience was worse. Cutting 25,000 employees only two and a half years after acquiring Nokia’s mobile unit effectively killed any chance Microsoft Mobile had of succeeding.

Microsoft Mobile is a study of how differences in national culture can add to already poor conditions. Though differences in national culture are not the primary reason Microsoft Mobile failed, they did add to the complexity inherent in the post-merger integration process. In fact, the differences were small and could have been easily reconciled. Had Microsoft exercised a greater level of patience, Microsoft could have realized many of the sought-after synergies which can arise when companies effectively execute cross-border deals. Microsoft Mobile could have prospered as employees from different cultures came together and cooperated.

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